Bubble Nebula NGC 7635 & Open Star Cluster M52

The Bubble Nebula NGC 7635 & Open Star Cluster M52
The Bubble Nebula NGC 7635 & Open Star Cluster M52
 The Bubble Nebula NGC 7635, Open Star Cluster M52 and NGC 7538 . Taken with 80mm telescope
The Bubble Nebula NGC 7635, Open Star Cluster M52 and NGC 7538
Telescope / LensTMB 80mm Refractor fl/384mm
Mount TypeAstro-Physics 1200
CameraSBIG ST10xme cfw9
 FiltersHa, LRGB Astrodon
 FilmCCD
 Exposure190 minutes Ha,LRGB
 ProcessingCCDStack, Photoshop CS2 & Picture Wind Pro
 DateImages taken 09/05/2008
 Location June Mountain 122° 43.528′ W, 43° 48.407′ N
22 miles S of Dexter, Oregon
Conditions3232′ clear calm skies magnitude 6

The Bubble Nebula NGC 7635 is also known as Caldwell 11. This is an emission nebula in the constellation of Cassiopeia. The Bubble nebula was created from a massive young central star, because it is very hot, it has created a stellar wind. As a result, this stellar wind has formed a “Bubble.  Surrounding the nebula is a massive molecular cloud with dark clumps that consequently form new stars as the material condenses. The Bubble nebula NGC 7635, has a diameter of 7-9 light years and lies approximately 8,000 light years from earth.

M52 is located just above and to the left.  Open Star Cluster M52 (NGC 7654) is located in the Northern portion of the constellation Cassiopeia.  It is 19 light years in diameter, at a distance of  5,000 light years from earth

NGC 7538 is another nebula to the right of the Bubble nebula.  NGC 7538 is 9,100 light years away and reside in the Constellation Cepheus.  The largest protostar discovered so far is forming here. This protostar is 300 times the size of our solar system.  This nebula is also a very active star forming region.

A narrow band Ha filter was used to help capture the nebulosity made up of primarily Hydrogen.  LRGB filters were also used in a SBIG ST10XME CCD through a TMB 80mm f/6 refractor & TeleVue 0.08 field flattner/reducer.