Trifid Nebula M20 NGC 6514

Trifid Nebula M20 NGC 6514
Trifid Nebula M20 NGC 6514
Telescope / Lens TEC 140mm  f/7
Mount Type Astrophysics 1200
Camera SBIG ST10XME NAGB
 Filters Astrodon LRGB e-series filters (generation 1)
 Film  CCD
 Exposure 150 minutes (2 hours 30 minutes) LRGB (L=75 m (15×5) RGB=25 each, 5 min. subs
 Processing CCDSoft, CCDStack, AIP, Photoshop CS2
 Date  07/19/2009
 Location Snow Peak, S/E of Cottage Grove, Oregon 122° 52′ 35″ W, 43° 31′ 21″N
 Conditions 4658′ elevation, magnitude 6+ Skies; Clear ; Humidity 65-80% 51 degrees, wind 0-3 M.P.H.

M 20 (NGC 6514) Trifid Nebula
The Trifid Nebula (Messier 20 or M20 & NGC 6514) reside within the constellation of Sagittarius. The name Trifid refers to the three lobe appearance of the red emission portion of the Nebula. Recent images ahowh a blue reflection nebulosity and an open star cluster. The dark dust lanes, dark nebula, is designated Barnard’s 85.  This object shows up well in amateur telescopes reviling lots of detail and visible to the naked eye (magnitude 6.3) at dark sky locations. The actual distance is estimated at 5200 light years.  Some stars associated with M20 are 2700 to 5700 light years distant.

M20 itself is approximately 21 light years in diameter, roughly 15,000’xs larger than our solar system. Recent images that go deeper reveal a blue glow around the main red emission portion of the Trifid indicating that some of the reflected nebulosity runs behind and around the red portion. Earlier shots I’ve taken did not reveal this, but CCD images of a couple hours or more reveal this phenomenon. NASA’s Spitzer Space telescope discovered 30 embryonic & 120 newborn stars within the Trifid in 2005.

The image of the Trifid nebula was dominant on the view scenes of the Enterprise, Original Stark Trek series.

Star Forming Area
Trifid Nebula M20 Crop
Trifid Nebula M20 Crop-The close-up images show a dense cloud of dust and gas, which is a stellar nursery full of embryonic stars.